Today’s modern stair lifts are designed for ease-of-use, safety, and simplicity. They are easy to control, can be installed quickly, and are relatively maintenance-free. For those who are no longer able to adequately maneuver stairs, they can restore freedom and independence.

But, some level of mobility is required to use a basic stair lift. While you’re sitting down, you must be able to hold yourself upright. You must be able to maneuver yourself into the chair, or with the assistance of others if a caregiver is present. You may need to check out some other solution if you are not physically capable of getting in and out of a stair lift.

On the other hand, if you are wheelchair-bound, there are lifts which are made specifically for wheelchairs. We are going to explore the ways to use a stair lift if you must be in a wheelchair but have the ability to transfer yourself. We will also introduce a system that is considered a wheelchair-accessible stair lift – a wheelchair lift.

Using a Stair Lift From a Wheelchair

Numerous individuals needing assistance with moving from level to level in their home rely on stair lifts each and every day. Some of these individuals are in wheelchairs. If the person in question is able to transfer from a wheelchair to another surface (chair, couch, etc.), they should be able to use a stair lift. If there is someone in the house who wishes to carry their wheelchair to the next level, that’s one way to approach the situation.

Many wheelchair-bound individuals, however, have a wheelchair on the second level, placed by the end of the stair lift system, and one at the bottom of the staircase, too. This way, they can transfer from chair, to stair lift, and to the next chair on their own.

In addition to having sufficient mobility and transferability, the person riding the chair must be able to sit in an upright position, as previously mentioned.

Wheelchair Lifts

For those with limited or no transferability, there are several models of wheelchair lifts available. The two basic types are open and closed systems – referring to a type of housing surrounding the person riding the lift – and staircase-mounted versus elevator type systems.

Whereas stair lifts are easily installed, do not mount to a wall, and take up very little room, wheelchair lifts are another story. To find out whether or not your home is adaptable to a wheelchair lift system, a representative from the lift company will need to visit the scene. They will be able to tell you if there is enough room for a wheelchair lift and if it’s a good fit.

Some wheelchair lifts ride up and down the staircase area, while others have their own track upon which they move from one level to another.

Where to Get Wheelchair Accessible Stair Lifts

Freedom Stairlifts offers not only systems for straight staircases, curved stairways, and/or outdoor stairs, we also have wheelchair lifts. If you must use a wheelchair, these lifts can assist you in moving from one level to another, safely and comfortably. One of our representatives will be happy to come to your home, assess your unique circumstances, and recommend the most suitable product.

Contact us to find out more about solutions involving stair lifts.

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